Tag Archives: publishing

JD’s Writers Blog: all about Books & Leisure, and More!

JD’s Writers Blog: all about Books & Leisure, and More! #amwriting #books

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JD Holiday: JD’s Writers Blog: From the NY TIMES: Amazon and Hachette Resolve Dispute

JD Holiday: JD’s Writers Blog: From the NY TIMES: Amazon and Hachette Resolve Dispute.

By DAVID STREITFELD. Alexandra Alter contributed reporting.

Hachette won an important victory on Thursday in its battle with Amazon: the ability to set its own prices for e-books, which it sees as critical to its survival. But even as the publisher and retailer announced a negotiated peace after sparring since January, hardly anyone seemed in the mood for celebratory fireworks.

The conflict, which played out in increasingly contentious forums as the year progressed, left wounds too deep for that. Amazon has been cast as a bully in publications across the ideological spectrum, and a large group of authors is calling for it to be investigated on antitrust grounds. Its sales were hit by the dispute, analysts said. Hachette, too, revealed its vulnerability.

Amazon’s supporters publicly questioned the need for Hachette, the fourth largest publisher, to exist in an era when authors can publish themselves digitally, an accusation Hachette was reluctant to respond to.

And even if Amazon got less in the deal than it originally wanted, it still controls nearly half the book trade, an unprecedented level for one retailer. And the dispute showed it is not afraid to use its power to discourage sales.

One common feeling among those who produce, sell, market and publicize books: relief. “The fact that these two companies are no longer shooting at each other is a really good thing for all of us,” said Jane Dystel, president of Dystel & Goderich Literary Management.

Len Edgerly, who is host of an independent podcast, the Kindle Chronicles, called the brawl “a painful ordeal.”

“As a longtime Kindle enthusiast, I have been in Amazon’s corner throughout the struggle, but I never doubted the other side’s sincerity in wanting what’s best for authors and readers,” Mr. Edgerly said.

What began as a spat between supplier and retailer — completely routine, Amazon said — soon became a public standoff. Depending on where you stood, it was a struggle between the future and the past, the East Coast and the West Coast, culture and commerce, the masses and the elite, technologists and traditionalists, predator and prey.

James Patterson was a forceful voice against Amazon during the dispute. “Books and publishing need to be preserved if not protected in this country,” said Mr. Patterson, a best-selling Hachette novelist. “For the moment, this deal helps do that.”

The multiyear agreement, which includes both e-books and print books, broadly follows a deal Amazon recently worked out with Simon & Schuster. A source with knowledge of that deal said it was negotiated relatively quickly and gave the publisher control over most of its pricing but offered incentives to sell at lower prices. Amazon got increased co-op funds, the payments for placement on the retailer’s website. Simon & Schuster declined to confirm the terms.

James L. McQuivey, a Forrester analyst, said that if Hachette won in the short term, it would be a different story in the long run.

“Hachette got Amazon to allow them to control pricing while also cutting the amount of money Amazon takes if the publisher does engage in discounts, which appears like a victory,” the analyst said. “But in the end this all cements Amazon’s ultimate long-term role in this business, which will only put Hachette right back in this situation every time they are up for renegotiation.” 

Neither side gave many details of the deal, but both pronounced themselves satisfied. An Amazon executive, David Naggar, said Amazon was “pleased with this new agreement as it includes specific financial incentives for Hachette to deliver lower prices.”

Amazon feels publishers get too much of the revenue from e-books, so that was another major area of contention. In a letter Thursday to authors and agents, Michael Pietsch, Hachette’s chief executive, said the percentage of revenue on which Hachette authors’ e-book royalties are based “will not decrease under this agreement.”   The change for consumers might be slight.

READ The Rest At:www.nytimes.com/2014/11/14/technology/amazon-hachette-ebook-dispute.html?_r=0

JD Holiday: JD’s Writers Blog

JD Holiday: JD’s Writers Blog.

A New Way to Add your Picture Book on Kindle, Plus Expand Your Reach with a Digital Audiobook on Amazon!

A New Way to Add your Picture Book on Kindle.

Kindle Kids’ Book Creator is a downloadable tool that supports the creation of illustrated children’s books. It provides you with everything you need to add your images, add text, add basic interactivity (e.g., Kindle Text Pop Ups), and output a book that can be uploaded through Kindle Direct Publishing for sale to Kindle customers. It is available for both PC and Mac users.

Kindle Kids’ Book Creator is a free tool for authors and publishers to turn their illustrated children’s books into great-looking Kindle books. Kindle Kids’ Book Creator makes it easy for authors and publishers to import artwork, add text to pages, and preview how their book will look on Kindle devices. 

With the click of a button, authors also can add Kindle Text Pop-Ups to make it easy to read their book on any device, including smart phones, tablets, and PCs. Authors then can publish to Kindle and share their story with tens of millions of Amazon customers worldwide. 

Kindle Kids’ Book Creator supports multiple layouts for children’s books, including facing page spreads. Kindle Kids’ Book Creator accepts the most popular graphic file types, so authors are free to create art in their preferred design tools. Authors can even import a book from a multi-page PDF, making it easier to ever to take a book originally created for print and turn it into a Kindle book. When you are ready to publish your book, simply go to Kindle Direct Publishing to upload your book.

Kindle Kids’ Book Creator also makes it quick to preview how the content will look across Kindle devices. With an integrated preview feature, authors can validate that their books look beautiful on Kindle Fire tablets. 

At: www.amazon.com/gp/feature.html?docId=1002979921&ref_=pe_445910_122737500_2

Expand Your Reach with a Digital Audiobook on Amazon.

The Audiobook Creation Exchange (ACX) makes it easy to produce and distribute your digital audiobook, and you’ll also be able to take advantage of the exciting new Kindle features Whispersync for Voice and Immersion Reading to reach more readers in more ways. 
 You can use ACX to produce a digital audiobook version of your book, and to enable your book for the new Whispersync for Voice functionality which allows customers to switch seamlessly between reading the Kindle book and listening to the professionally-narrated audiobook across devices without losing their place. Audiobooks will also be enabled for Immersion Reading which will allow customers with Kindle Fire HD devices to listen to the professional narration as the words of the eBook are highlighted on the screen. When customers buy your Kindle book, they will be able to purchase your Whispersync for Voice-ready Audible audiobook at a special limited time discounted price. 

https://kdp.amazon.com/help?topicId=A3CISEMGMV9KR5

http://www.acx.com/help/authors-as-narrators/200626860

 

JD Holiday

JD Holiday.

Aaron Shepard’s The 40% Error, What you need to know about working and PRINTING BOOKS with Ingram Spark

When I start to think about getting a book into print, Aaron Shepard is one, if not the top one! who’s opinion I look at.
This month, Aaron Shepard’s blog is about the changes in discount for authors/publishers that print or are thinking of printing with Ingram Spark and the difference between Spark and Lightning Source. If you publish your own books, meaning – working with the printer yourself – this article is for you.

Read Aaron Shepard’s blog at:
http://www.newselfpublishing.com/blog/#IngramSpark5